how were the earley pre 8s blued

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doclane
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Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:44 pm

how were the earley pre 8s blued

Post by doclane » Sat Jul 23, 2016 8:11 pm

got a 8 thats need of some tlc bore is awsome no dents but needs a good blueing i do rust blue cold don't last what did thy come with.

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Sarge756
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Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 10:17 am
Location: N.Florida on the coast

Re: how were the earley pre 8s blued

Post by Sarge756 » Sun Jul 24, 2016 4:25 am

I am assuming by "cold" rust blue you are referring to the slow rust blue done with a damp box instead of steam or boiling water. Not lasting? How so? Have found that process to not only be the most labor intensive and tedious but also the most beautiful and longest lasting. An alternative that I am in favor of unless I was doing a high dollar double gun is the hot rust blue procedure. Pretty much the same as the cold method with damp box but a tank of boiling water or a steam chamber speeds it up tremendously. It also causes a chemical change of the product faster by introducing oxegen from the water that converts the ferrous oxide(rust) to ferric oxide (the black finish).
As with any blue job the most important step is the preparation and polishing. I do them entirely by hand and don`t use a buffing wheel. I`ll let you guess how long an apprentice must serve under a master to achieve master status with a wheel. Hint...not months. Seen many blue jobs with corners rounded off ,side plates dished and stamping obliterated from someone that thought they knew how to buff.
Products are many. Easiest I`ve found is the old Herter`s Belgium blue that is still available.It is most forgiving and doesnt require a carding wheel using damp steel wool instead. Have found it to be durable.Mark Lee Express blue also gives good results but during the carding process it is imperative that no water gets on the metal or spots will occur that will not come out unless repolished. Not fun.
Came across a new product that I havn`t tried but plan to soon. Lots of good reviews on it. Uses steam instead of boiling water . Link below with good information you might be interested in.
Joe
http://www.rustblue.com/
".......ain't many troubles that a man cain't fix
With seven hundred dollars and a thirty ought six."

doclane
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:44 pm

Re: how were the earley pre 8s blued

Post by doclane » Sun Jul 24, 2016 6:22 am

hay joe thanks forgot the period after rust blue. be using brownells classic rust blue seems the color iam looking for is a shade or to off its to black blue for a 8 i think. Going to look in to the link you sent joe thanks. any one else have something thy have used let me no.

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Sarge756
Posts: 763
Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 10:17 am
Location: N.Florida on the coast

Re: how were the earley pre 8s blued

Post by Sarge756 » Sun Jul 24, 2016 2:45 pm

Hope that the info on the link helps. Bob`s approach by mixing up different formulas may be what you are looking for. He has a variety available.If you decide to order and are not sure use the contact information or the Blog and ask his advice first.
Joe
".......ain't many troubles that a man cain't fix
With seven hundred dollars and a thirty ought six."

rjmeyer314
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2016 8:31 am

Re: how were the earley pre 8s blued

Post by rjmeyer314 » Tue Aug 23, 2016 7:45 am

I have a model 8 in "30-30 Rem" made in 1907, the first year of production for the 30 Remington. It doesn't actually appear to have been blued. It seems to have a finish that has a faint greenish tinge to it. I don't think it has been refinished, but I could be wrong.

doclane
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:44 pm

Re: how were the earley pre 8s blued

Post by doclane » Tue Aug 23, 2016 8:07 am

I know what you're talking about I've seen these guns come from a chocolate brown to a light rust color to a Belgium Blue to that green you're talking about with age.

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