Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

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robnjay
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:20 am

Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by robnjay » Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:33 am

I have a Model 8 rifle in .35 Remington which was disassembled by an idiot who took the barrel apart, along with everything else.
It would be a very nice gun, the stock, blueing, etc. is in fine shape...

I now have everything I need to reassemble it but the recoil spring..

Does anyone have one? Not available at Numrich, Jack First, Sarco, etc.
I found one that is in stock, but they don't know which caliber it is for.

So - If you don't know where I can get the spring, but you can get your hands on one, please reply to this with the dimensions:
1. Wire size in thousandths
2. Diameter
3. Length
3. Number of coils

Thanks
Rob
361- Nine Three Five - Oh three four 3

chas1949
Posts: 57
Joined: Wed Oct 02, 2013 12:40 pm

Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by chas1949 » Mon Aug 13, 2018 3:09 pm

10" L
29 coils
.750 - Dia.
.055-.060 wire dia. depending where measured.

had a 35 barrel apart so I checked.

Hope this helps

robnjay
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:20 am

Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by robnjay » Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:58 am

Unmarked spring the dealer had was an action spring :(.

Contacted Wolff Spring
They don't currently make any springs in that large of a wire size

Does anyone know where I might be able to find a recoil spring for this gun?

Thanks
Rob

kenhwind
Posts: 164
Joined: Tue Jun 23, 2009 6:50 am

Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by kenhwind » Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:53 pm

eBay, or GunBroker
KEN

DIESELMAN
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Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2018 7:48 am

Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by DIESELMAN » Sun Aug 19, 2018 8:29 am

The recoil spring around the barrel is probably like the "buffer spring" in the stock, which is made of "unobtainium" IF you search for a Model 8 buffer spring. However, within the last year sometime Numrich Gun Parts has added a note to their Model 8 parts information/index mentioning that a Remington Model 11 shotgun buffer spring can be used for a replacement. The Model 11 is the Remington licensed copy of the Browning Auto 5 and the Model 8 and Auto 5 are very similar designs.

Its possible that an Auto 5 recoil spring from a smaller gauge like a 16-gauge may fit a Model 8 so its worth investigating that possibility even if the spring has to be modified IF you actually NEED the recoil spring because its missing and aren't just replacing it because you've got the gun apart. I can tell you from experience that the recoil spring in Model 8/81 rifles does very little as far as managing the overall recoil of the rifle goes and its probably a waste of time replacing an existing recoil spring. The buffer spring IS the main "recoil spring" in Browning long-recoil guns and its the one that gets the real pounding.

I recently installed a "Model 11" buffer spring in my 1914 Grade C in .35 Remington after several years of limited shooting of that classic rifle because even with the lightest loads that would reliably cycle it I still felt like it was beating itself to death during recoil. It also wasn't very much fun to shoot and I'm NOT a recoil-sensitive shooter. When I first got the rifle I did some load development for accuracy and precision and ended up with around 34 grains of IMR4064 with WLR primers and 200-grain Hornady RN bullets. They chronograph about 1750-1800 fps at the muzzle and that's about as light as I could go without running into cycling issues. It shoots 2-3 MOA at 100 yards benchrested on bean bags and with the factory front sight and a receiver-mounted Redfield rear peep sight with the aperture removed to make it kind of a Ghost Ring setup.

The recoil issue has always bothered me because its obviously a 100+ year old rifle and has definitely been around the block a few times. Well-used but not abused is how I'd describe it. Just the perfect amount of "patina". So I've kept hunting buffer springs since shortly after I bought the rifle from a buddy and I considered contacting Wolff or some other specialty spring manufacturer just to see if a small run of "custom" springs would be possible and if they'd bankrupt a small country. I checked Numrich repeatedly out of desperation and checked just a few months before that note showed up 6 months ago or so. I think the spring was around $12 if I remember right. That's what I call "cheap insurance".

As a professional diesel mechanic and very, very amateur "gunsmith" I STRONGLY recommend routine replacement of buffer springs and/or recoil springs in ALL semi-auto guns. Springs wear out and the more powerful the cartridge the faster that happens. Some will say its "cycles" that wears out springs and nothing else but as a mechanic and someone who has "KaBoom!ed" a 1911 pistol and has seen a high-quality, low round count "factory" recoil spring in a Les Baer 1911 get reduced to "Slinky" strength as a result, I can tell you that how FAR and how FAST a spring gets cycled definitely matters.

I was pretty amazed at just how MUCH of a difference that new buffer spring made in my rifle. And I was concerned my "light" ammo might not cycle it reliably and I may find this winter that I need to step them up a little. But post-overhaul (I completely disassembled, cleaned and lubricated the rifle) it works perfectly and is an entirely different rifle to shoot. It now shoots like I expected it to shoot all along. I've got a pretty big pile of semi-auto rifles and I'd put the recoil and shooting experience about with my M1 Garand and my AR15 in 7.62x40WT. I've got an M1A and an LR308 as well and I'd say they both kick noticeably harder than the Model 8.

I did consider replacing the actual recoil spring around the barrel but in reality that recoil spring is just a return spring for the barrel after it stops during recoil and the bolt carrier assembly continues rearward. The bolt carrier assembly slamming against its stop - which is the collapsed buffer spring - is where all the "kick" and sharp, nasty recoil came from in my rifle. Model 8s can be a little "fragile" and my gun guru buddy whom I purchased it from told me that when the .300 Savage came out in the Model 81s that pretty much pushed the design to its strength and reliability and durability limits. .35 Remington isn't far behind the .300 Savage and as I said, ALL semi-autos should get new springs as "routine maintenance" so I'm happy to see someone figured out what I feel kind of foolish for never thinking about because it never occurred to me an Auto 5 might be THAT similar and I've been kind of obsessed with the buffer spring thing ever since I got the rifle.

Please pass this information on to anybody looking to make a "new gun" out of their old Model 8.

robnjay
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:20 am

Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by robnjay » Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:25 pm

I found someone selling Browning A5 recoil springs, called him, and had him measure the springs for 16 and 20 gauge models.
Diameters are wrong and they are about 1" too short.

This is starting to look pretty grim.

So I'm back to scouring the web for anyone with a recoil spring for this rifle.

Thanks for your feedback!

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Phyrbird
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Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by Phyrbird » Wed Aug 29, 2018 4:22 pm

When you say "recoil spring" is it the one in the tube behind the bolt or the one in the barrel sleeve at the front or the one at the back in the sleeve? There are 3 that make the action work. Recoil spring is typically in front behind the barrel nut. Buffer spring (usually square cross-section) is always behind the above spring. The action spring is the small one in the tube at rear of the action, it returns the bolt after the barrel travels all the way forward. I use the terms most found on the Remington parts lists. It can be confusing.
I agree we should be replacing springs regularly to eliminate "set". But I have not had any fail yet. Nor have I had a barrel sleeve hammer loose from the head which is a rather bad failure mode of these rifles. JMBrowning did a good design job, wish modern smiths & manufacturers did too.
Phyrbird
SOKY

robnjay
Posts: 4
Joined: Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:20 am

Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by robnjay » Mon Oct 08, 2018 9:20 pm

We were not able to find the spring, but we were able to purchase a complete barrel assembly to get the rifle working.

As a result, we are now in possession of an extra barrel assembly that is surplus to our needs.

This is a Model 8 barrel assembly with everything except the recoil spring and the front an rear open sights for the sleeve. It is in very good condition and we would like to sell it very reasonably (as compared to Numrich prices) as one lot of parts.

Picture:

https://i.imgur.com/OpUbIK2.jpg

Please address all inquiries to lonestarammo@gmail.com

Thanks
Rob

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Phyrbird
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Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by Phyrbird » Tue Oct 09, 2018 11:26 am

Dieselman,
You suggested you have installed a Model 11 spring in the barrel sleeve of a 35Rem. :idea: I am very interested in the possibility of similar work for some projects. Could you be kind enough to detail just what was done, the exact part used for replacement, & how/if it was modified? I really agree we should replace old springs if possible, and as no-one is making replacements, the alternative could be a great way to extend life of our ladies and reduce the hammering from recoil. :) Please send info to:

carlsandage@yahoo.com

And perhaps post in forum in separate thread for members if you choose...
Phyrbird
SOKY

LyingBastard
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Re: Recoil Spring dimensions for Model 8 in .35 Rem

Post by LyingBastard » Fri Dec 07, 2018 8:48 am

So I talked to the guy who made recoil springs for paratrooper FALs whether he would be interested in doing a run of recoil springs. I could post his reply here but the bottom line is they had to have 100 sets sold just to break even. In the Model 8/81 case, that would mean 100 per caliber.

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